What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out?

What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out

Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids
Original network CBS (1972–84) first-run syndication (1984–85)
Picture format NTSC
Audio format Mono
Original release September 9, 1972 – August 10, 1985

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What year did the original Fat Albert come out?

What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out The comedian continues to defend his renowned persona from 1967 despite his strong advocacy for the instruction of children in healthy eating habits. We ought to do the same. In 1969, Bill Cosby appeared alongside Quincy Jones (Concord Records) During an animated conversation with Bill Cosby on Monday about school lunches (“What is juice?”) and the part that the media plays in the rise of obesity, Steve Clemons from The Atlantic asked about Fat Albert: “Why don’t we have a new version with a lean and mean Albert?” Cosby was amused by the idea.

  • Cosby had a puzzled expression.
  • “Well, I’m not sure about that,” she said.
  • The comedian, who is now 75 years old, has just lately emerged as a loud proponent of nutrition education; nonetheless, he has been depicting obesity in a progressive and thoughtful manner for the past 45 years, which is well before it became a topic of general interest.

The phrase “was developed by me because in those days, the 1960s, a big person was perceived to be someone who always chuckling, laughing, and lacking in any kind of power sufficient to take command. ” He did a good job of walking a very tight line. Cosby recognized an opening to break with that tradition.

  • “When we conducted the first show, the lads made fun of him, but they wanted him to play football because he was such a tremendous athlete that he ran over everyone.” At the time, the concept of even depicting a figure that was overweight was considered to be somewhat radical.
  • According to Dr.
  • Brian McDonough of Philadelphia’s KYW Newsradio, “In the ’60s, Fat Albert was in the minority, but now we’re looking at 60 percent of youngsters being overweight.” The narrative of how Fat Albert came to be stretches further back in time than the 1972 premiere of Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids on television.

The first appearance of the character was on Bill Cosby’s comedy album Revenge, which was released in 1967. On that album, Cosby delivers a narrative that similarly praises Fat Albert as the hero who saves the day. Cosby describes how he and his friends used to play a game called “buck buck” when they were children living in Philadelphia.

Five children would form a line and bend over while playing buck buck “so that they all appear like a long horse,” and “the aim was that the other kids would come up and cry, ‘Buck buck number one, come in!’ and then they’d run up, leap in the air, and land on the horse. ” And they would not stop until they had brought the horse to its knees.” Healthcare providers, local communities, and the wellness movement in the general public View all coverage here.

The group of buddies that Cosby kept were some of the most skilled buck-buckers in the area. After some time had passed, “these youngsters come down from the bad part of town, and they’re extremely tough – they’ve got toothpicks in the sides of their mouths and hats on sideways and trousers on backwards,” and they challenged them to the Buck Buck Championship of the World.

  • The score was rather close until Cosby and his friends brought out their final player.
  • “Come on out, you chubby little Albert.” The first time he talks about Fat Albert, he describes him as “The baddest buck buck breaker in the world weighed 2,000 pounds, and as he kicked open the door to his residence, you could hear him saying, “Hey, hey, heyyy!” he was the baddest buck buck breaker in the world.

Because he was unable to run very far, we constructed a little slope for him to walk down in order to help him build up his speed.” That initial recognizable “Hey, hey, hey!” was more of a rallying cry; you can image it being said over a crescendo of dramatic music.

  1. “What’s the ground doing shaking?’ – ‘It’s Fat Albert comin’ for you,'” is what Cosby says the rival buck buck squad said when they saw Fat Albert coming for them.
  2. He also recounts trees toppling over and buildings loosing bricks.
  3. He adds in those elements to depict what is obviously an exaggerated picture, but there is a subtle difference in that he does not make Fat Albert’s size the punch line of the joke.

It never comes out as cruel, which is typical of Cosby’s writing approach. Since the first episode of Fat Albert aired in 1967, however, we’ve witnessed a shift in the type of humor that’s based on obesity, going from “laughing with” to “laughing at” to “don’t bring it up.” We are just getting around to discussing the laughing with now.

  • Weird Al in “Fat,” 1988 (YouTube) The music video for the song “Fat” that was created by Weird Al Yankovic was awarded the Grammy for “Best Concept Music Video” in the year 1988.
  • The idea was to take Michael Jackson’s “Bad” music video, make the main singer morbidly obese, and make visual jokes about how he can’t go through a turnstile (because, he’s big) and how he is always eating (because, he’s fat).

“Well, I’ve never used a phone booth, And I’ve never seen my toes; When I’m going to the movies, I take up seven rows.” “Well, I’ve never used a phone booth, And I’ve never seen my toes.” The character is trying to convince us that he is courageous and confident, but in reality, he is a crippled foil, and we are supposed to laugh at his incompetence.

Family Guy’s Morbidly Obese Albert, from the year 2000 (Adult Swim) In an episode of Family Guy from the year 2000, the character “Morbidly Obese Albert” was shown. His Jabba-the-Hut-like physique practically filled the bed of a pickup truck, and he had his left foot amputated due to complications of diabetic necrosis.

The episode was a dark satire of Fat Albert. “Take a look at the bright side: from this point on, the price of your shoes will be cut in half.” The local gang extends an offer of chocolates to him, which he politely declines until grudgingly accepting with the words, “All right, maybe I’ll have one.” (After the customary denial,) It seems a lot like one of the early Fat Albert teachings on peer pressure or saying no to drugs, and there’s some dark comedy in the terrible truth that’s being presented here.

  • The scene goes much beyond the fat jokes that were popular in the 1980s.
  • Even while it would seem like the obvious solution to produce Skinny Fat Albert for 2012, we can’t ignore how important it is to show obesity in popular culture in a favorable light by depicting it in the form of strong and successful individuals as Fat Albert does.
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It does not take the place of the need for education and public health efforts to put a stop to the pandemic, but it does help in the fight against shaming and stereotyping in the process. Finding humor, empowerment, support, and education in depictions of the realities of the American population that do not exclude, shame, or endorse obesity would be a good place to start when discussing the portrayal of obesity in the media in the future. What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out

Was Fat Albert the first black cartoon?

It was no coincidence that ‘Hey, Hey, Hey, It’s Fat Albert,’ which was described by curators as the first ‘positive’ black-cast cartoon on TV (and served as the basis for the later series), was an NBC prime-time special in 1969, nor was it a coincidence that ‘The Jackson 5ive,’ which was the first Saturday morning cartoon series featuring black musicians, was made in the same year.

Why did Fat Albert get Cancelled?

The origins and background of the character Fat Albert may be found in Bill Cosby’s stand-up comedy performance titled “Buck Buck,” which was initially released as a recording in 1967 under the album title Revenge. The tales were derived from the experiences that Bill Cosby had while growing up in the ghetto of North Philadelphia.

  • Fat Albert first appeared as an animated character in the prime-time spectacular Hey, Hey, Hey, It’s Fat Albert, which was produced by Bill Cosby and renowned animator Ken Mundie in 1969.
  • The one-hour show, which was produced using a combination of live action and animation, was broadcast on NBC.
  • Herbie Hancock, a jazz pianist and organist, was responsible for writing and performing the score for the special in 1969.

The score was later included on the album Fat Albert Rotunda issued by Warner Bros. It was important to establish the real appearance of each of the Fat Albert Gang’s characters in order to include them into the animated segment of the show. Ken Mundie turned to Amby Paliwoda, an animator who had previously worked for Disney, in order to do this.

  1. Not only did Paliwoda design each and every figure for the Gang, but he also painted a “group picture” of them all.
  2. This “group portrait” was finally featured on the front page of TV Guide magazine just prior to the broadcast of the special.
  3. The show’s creators requested that NBC move Fat Albert to Saturday mornings, but the network’s programming executives declined the request on the grounds that the show was too instructional.

Following that, Bill Cosby and a newly formed production business known as Filmation Associates sold the IP to CBS. Character designs for the Fat Albert gang were mostly conceived up and executed by the artist Randy Hollar, with the aid of Michelle McKinney, who had previously worked as an animator for Disney, and under the supervision of Ken Brown.

  1. The sitcom had a new name when it first aired on CBS on September 9, 1972; it was titled Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids.
  2. Although there were breaks in between seasons, the production of the series ran for a total of 12 years.
  3. Another season of the show was shown in first-run syndication (1984–1985), and three prime-time holiday specials featuring the characters were also produced: one for Halloween, one for Christmas, and one for Easter.

Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, much like the majority of other Saturday morning cartoons of the era, had an adult laugh track. However, this feature was removed during the show’s last season. In 1989, episodes of the series were shown again on NBC Saturday mornings and on the USA Network.

  • The following was a post that was made by Bill Cosby on his Facebook page on January 15, 2013: “I’m telling you this because I believe there are individuals at work who will bring back Fat Albert in some form or another.
  • And it will be treasured by each and every succeeding generation “, suggesting that there is a possibility that the series will be revived at some point.

There has been no more information provided as of yet.

Who died at the end of Fat Albert?

Fernando Garcia What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out

Status Deceased
Race Latino
Hair Black
Eyes Black
Hat Blue

img class=’aligncenter wp-image-189362 size-full’ src=’https://threedelivery.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/kekogadavyfimu.jpg’ alt=’What Year Did Fat Albert Cartoon Come Out’ /> Fernando Garcia Young Fernando Garcia was a buddy of Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. He was of Latino descent and was a youngster. Even though Fernando was not the only character to pass away (the other one was Uncle Monty), he was the only character to pass away while being seen on screen in the episode “Gang Wars” from the eighth season, which aired on May 18, 1985.

Who created fat?

Since prehistoric times, humans have employed a wide variety of naturally occurring fats for a variety of reasons, including those that do not involve the consumption of food. For example, the Egyptians utilized olive oil as a lubricant in order to facilitate the movement of heavy building materials.

As early as 1400 BCE, they were also producing axle greases by combining fat and lime with a variety of other ingredients. Homer makes a passing reference to the use of oil as a loom help, while Pliny discusses the difference between hard and soft soaps. Since the dawn of time, people have lit their homes with candles and lamps that burn tallow or oil.

As a result of greater knowledge of the chemical composition of fats, a wider variety of commercial applications for fats have become available. It was not until approximately 1815 that the French scientist Michel-Eugène Chevreul (1786–1889) proved the chemical nature of fats and oils.C.W.

Scheele, a Swedish chemist, made the discovery in 1779 that glycerol could be produced from olive oil by heating it with litharge (lead monoxide). A few years later, someone figured out how to separate liquid acids from solid acids, and it was successful. Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès, a French chemist, is credited with inventing margarine.

In 1869, he won a competition established by Napoleon III for a good butter substitute, and the reward was awarded to the inventor of margarine. The contemporary hydrogenation process may trace its roots back to research conducted in the late 19th century.

This study ultimately resulted in the formation of the vegetable-oil shortening business as well as a wide range of uses in the industrial sector. Organic chemists made significant strides in their field following World War I, first advancing their understanding of fatty-acid compositions and then moving on to glyceride compositions.

The rise of the chemical industry prompted a concomitant increase in the use of fats both as raw materials and as intermediates in the production of a large number of different compounds. The current application of a large number of organic chemical reactions to fats and fatty acids laid the groundwork for the establishment of a brand-new industry that is seeing tremendous expansion.

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What was the first appearance of Fat Albert?

The introduction of Fat Albert for the first time. The television series “Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids” was conceived as a direct result of this one-hour special. The storyline was inspired by Bill Cosby’s “go-kart sketch” from his album “W. “, which was released in 1966.

The introduction of Fat Albert for the first time. The television series “Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids” was conceived as a direct result of this one-hour special. The storyline was inspired by the “go-kart skit” that appeared on Bill Cosby’s album “Wonderfulness” in 1966. The introduction of Fat Albert for the first time.

The television series “Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids” was conceived as a direct result of this one-hour special. The storyline was inspired by the “go-kart skit” that appeared on Bill Cosby’s album “Wonderfulness” in 1966.

Is Fat Albert a live action movie?

Fat Albert
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Joel Zwick
Screenplay by Bill Cosby Charles Kipps
Based on Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids by Bill Cosby
Produced by John Davis
Starring Kenan Thompson Kyla Pratt Bill Cosby
Cinematography Paul Elliott
Edited by Tony Lombardo
Music by Richard Gibbs
Production companies 20th Century Fox Davis Entertainment Company SAH Enterprises
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release dates December 10, 2004 ( Philadelphia ) December 25, 2004 (United States)
Running time 87 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $45 million
Box office $48.6 million

Fat Albert is a live-action/animated comedy film that was released in 2004 in the United States. The film is based on the animated television series Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids that was produced by Bill Cosby in 1972 for Filmation. The lead role of the title character is played by Kenan Thompson.

  1. After being transformed by Fat Albert into three-dimensional humans, the cartoon characters are forced to confront the disparities that exist between their world and the real world.
  2. The movie serves as a continuation of the series; Fat Albert and the gang leave their 1970s cartoon world and join the real world of the 2000s in order to assist a young woman named Doris Robertson (played by Kyla Pratt) in overcoming the difficulties that come with being an outcast at her school.

The movie was released on December 25, 2004, and it had a total gross of $48 million while having a budget of $45 million. On Rotten Tomatoes, it has a rating of 23% approval and is described as “bland yet good natured” in the critical consensus section of the website.

Who created Fat Albert and The Cosby Kids?

The origins and background of the character Fat Albert may be found in Bill Cosby’s stand-up comedy performance titled “Buck Buck,” which was initially released as a recording in 1967 under the album title Revenge. The tales were derived from the experiences that Bill Cosby had while growing up in the ghetto of North Philadelphia.

  • Fat Albert first appeared as an animated character in the prime-time spectacular Hey, Hey, Hey, It’s Fat Albert, which was produced by Bill Cosby and renowned animator Ken Mundie in 1969.
  • The one-hour show, which was produced using a combination of live action and animation, was broadcast on NBC.
  • Herbie Hancock, a jazz pianist and organist, was responsible for writing and performing the score for the special in 1969.

The score was later included on the album Fat Albert Rotunda issued by Warner Bros. It was important to establish the real appearance of each of the Fat Albert Gang’s characters in order to include them into the animated segment of the show. Ken Mundie turned to Amby Paliwoda, an animator who had previously worked for Disney, in order to do this.

  • Not only did Paliwoda design each and every figure for the Gang, but he also painted a “group picture” of them all.
  • This “group portrait” was finally featured on the front page of TV Guide magazine just prior to the broadcast of the special.
  • The show’s creators requested that NBC move Fat Albert to Saturday mornings, but the network’s programming executives declined the request on the grounds that the show was too instructional.

Following that, Bill Cosby and a newly formed production business known as Filmation Associates sold the IP to CBS. Character designs for the Fat Albert gang were mostly conceived up and executed by the artist Randy Hollar, with the aid of Michelle McKinney, who had previously worked as an animator for Disney, and under the supervision of Ken Brown.

  • The sitcom had a new name when it first aired on CBS on September 9, 1972; it was titled Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids.
  • Although there were breaks in between seasons, the production of the series ran for a total of 12 years.
  • Another season of the show was shown in first-run syndication (1984–1985), and three prime-time holiday specials featuring the characters were also produced: one for Halloween, one for Christmas, and one for Easter.

Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, much like the majority of other Saturday morning cartoons of the era, had an adult laugh track. However, this feature was removed during the show’s last season. In 1989, episodes of the series were shown again on NBC Saturday mornings and on the USA Network.

  1. The following was a post that was made by Bill Cosby on his Facebook page on January 15, 2013: “I’m telling you this because I believe there are individuals at work who will bring back Fat Albert in some form or another.
  2. And it will be treasured by each and every succeeding generation “, suggesting that there is a possibility that the series will be revived at some point.
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There has been no more information provided as of yet.

What is the theme song in Fat Albert?

Plot – (From Wikipedia) A classic animated segment that features Fat Albert and the Junkyard Gang singing the show’s theme song, “Gonna Have a Good Time,” kicks off the movie. In reality, Doris Robertson is a melancholy adolescent who is still grieving the loss of her grandfather.

  1. Despite the attempts of her foster sister Lauri to provide her a social life and boost her popularity, Doris is choosing to ignore her foster sister’s support.
  2. Doris sheds a tear as she controls the TV as Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids are playing since she has just found out that her parents would be gone on business in the Poconos for the next two days.

The rip creates a gateway between the cartoon world and the actual world, and Fat Albert appears in real life, alerting her to the fact that she has a problem. After that, Rudy, Dumb Donald, Mushmouth, Bucky, and Weird Harold all escape, and Bill instructs Russell to remain in place and provide cover for the others.

Doris swears that she is well, but the group understands that this is not the case. The show comes to a close, and they are forced to wait until the concert the following day to return. They accompany Doris to school and are fascinated by the various new forms of technology they see there, such as pop cans, mobile phones, and computers.

Fat Albert takes notice of Lauri, and his feelings for her quickly develop into love. Reggie, an obnoxious classmate who has an unhealthy obsession with Lauri, challenges Albert to a race on the track, which Albert ultimately wins. In yet another effort to be of assistance to Doris, the group talks several cheerleaders into inviting them all to a party that is held outside.

  • Doris gives in to some pressure and decides to go, after which she goes shopping at a nearby mall.
  • At some point during the festivities, Fat Albert and the rest of the group make their way up to the stage and perform a rap cover of their theme song.
  • Following that, Lauri and Albert dance together.
  • By dancing with Doris, Reggie tries in vain to provoke her jealousy and get her attention.

After determining that Lauri is not paying attention to him, he makes an attempt to kiss Doris. Doris’s feelings are hurt, so she raises a fuss. The young man is cautioned by Fat Albert to keep his distance from Doris. The following day, Doris attends school, but she convinces her friends to visit the park instead of accompanying her to school.

  • Weird Harold, who is always clumsy, decides to join a basketball game and ends up playing really well.
  • A little girl teaches Mushmouth, who is unable to speak in a regular manner, how to speak properly.
  • When Dumb Donald visits the library, he is finally able to read, and he also takes off the pink hat that was obscuring his face.

When Doris drives them home, three of the gang members, Bucky, Weird Harold, and Dumb Donald (whose eyes float in the TV without the hat on), jump into the TV. Before the other four can join, however, Breaking News interrupts the show. Fat Albert and Bill had a heated discussion behind closed doors about going back.

Rudy, a car built out of trash, is used to transport Doris and Lauri to a fair by the gang. In the meantime, Rudy has fallen in love with Doris and has asked her if she would go out with him if he was a real person, and she has answered in the affirmative. Fat Albert goes to see his creator, Bill Cosby, in order to inform him of the predicament and get some advice on how to proceed.

Mr. Cosby explains to him that his character, Fat Albert, is based on Doris’ grandfather, Albert Robertson. This answers Doris’ uncertainty as to why Fat Albert feels so familiar to her. Mr. Cosby informs him that his character is based on Doris’ grandfather, Albert Robertson.

Fat Albert is given a stern warning by Bill Cosby that he must return to the land of cartoons or he will become dust made of celluloid (as indicated by the faded color of their clothes). Albert is inconsolable and attempts to explain to Lauri that he has no choice but to go, but she misinterprets his behavior as callousness.

The following day, Mushmouth, Rudy, and Bill make their return on the television (with Mushmouth starting to speak unclear again). Doris and Lauri are participating in the track meet, so Albert waits and goes there to cheer Doris on to success. Lauri is also competing.

Reggie, who saw the gang on the TV, makes an effort to intimidate Albert, but Albert pulls him away. Albert is the one who discovered the identity of the group. On a rented skateboard, Albert makes a mad dash to the house where the girls are. He bids farewell to Doris and Lauri, the latter of whom has come to believe that Albert is from the TV, and then he enters the television set once more.

(Remember that there are no doubles of genuine persons in the real world.) After some time has passed, Bill Cosby and his buddies, who served as the inspiration for the Junkyard Gang, visit the cemetery of their longtime buddy Albert Robertson and express their sorrow there.

  1. Doris is keeping an eye on them.
  2. The elderly men flee in a panic; deep down, they are still children, just like the ones on the television show that Bill Cosby encouraged them to become.
  3. Before the final credits begin to roll, Fat Albert is seen attempting to leap off the screen, indicating that members of the audience require assistance, and even suggesting to a member of the audience seated in the back of the theater that they should return to the front in order to finish watching the credits.

The lads drag Fat Albert back inside, and then the closing credits begin again, this time with a mix of the voices of the animated characters and the live-action actors singing the Fat Albert Theme Song.