When Did Scooby Doo Cartoon Come Out?

When Did Scooby Doo Cartoon Come Out
Gerelateerd What have you been up to, Scooby-Doo? 14 september 2002 11 September 1976 Episode of The Scooby-Doo Show Scooby‑Doo! 5th of April, 2010 Mystery, Incorporated

Was Scooby-Doo made in the 70s?

Scooby-Doo
A scene from “What a Night for a Knight”, the first episode of Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! ; clockwise from top: Shaggy Rogers , Fred Jones , Scooby-Doo , Velma Dinkley , and Daphne Blake
Created by Joe Ruby Ken Spears
Original work Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! (1969–70)
Owner Warner Bros. Discovery
Print publications
Comics see List of comics
Films and television
Film(s) see List of films
Short film(s) see List of shorts
Television series see List of television series
Television special(s) see List of specials
Games
Video game(s) see List of video games
Audio
Soundtrack(s) The Ultimate Collection Scooby-Doo
Official website
Official website

Scooby-Doo is an American cartoon media property that consists of a number of animated television shows that have been created from 1969 all the way up till the current day, in addition to its various offshoots. Joe Ruby and Ken Spears, both of whom worked as writers for Hanna-Barbera Productions, came up with the concept for the first Scooby-Doo television series in 1969.

  1. Teenagers Fred Jones, Daphne Blake, Velma Dinkley, and Shaggy Rogers, together with their talking Great Dane named Scooby-Doo, appeared in this Saturday morning cartoon series.
  2. Together, they solved mysteries involving apparently supernatural entities through a series of shenanigans and mishaps.
  3. The first run of Scooby-Doo episodes aired on CBS from 1969 through 1976, after which the show was relocated to ABC.

Scooby-Doo aired on ABC in a variety of incarnations until the show was canceled in 1985. During that time, the network also broadcast a spin-off called A Pup, which featured the characters in younger forms. From 1988 to 1991, he was known by the name Scooby-Doo.

  1. Between the years 2002 and 2008, two new Scooby-Doo series were remade and shown as part of the Kids’ WB programming block on The WB and its successor, The CW.
  2. Starting in 2010, Cartoon Network has been releasing brand new versions of their classic shows, and this trend will continue until 2018.
  3. Boomerang, the sister station of Cartoon Network, airs frequent reruns of the different Scooby-Doo television shows in the United States and other countries.

The latest installment of the Scooby-Doo franchise, titled Scooby-Doo and Guess Who?, made its debut on June 27, 2019, as an original series on the streaming service provided by Boomerang and, later, on HBO Max. Scooby-Doo was voted as the fifth-best television animation of all time by TV Guide in the year 2013.

Is Scooby-Doo 60’s or 70’s?

It appears that you are using an outdated web browser. It’s possible that it won’t display this website or others accurately. You need update to the latest version of this browser or try another one. #1 To begin, let me to just state that I think this is an excellent website.

  1. Second, I was wondering if any of you wonderful, generous individuals might assist me with anything that is perplexing to me.
  2. I was born and raised in England, and I’ve been a huge Scooby Doo fan ever since I was a little kid.
  3. However, why is it that people continue to assert things like “The 1970s brought us Scooby Doo,” when the program was originally developed in the late 1960s, and the first episodes were filmed in 1969? Something of similar effect was mentioned on this forum a day or two ago as part of a debate comparing animations from the 1970s and the 1980s; however, the 1970s did not produce Scooby-Doo.

It intrigues me since I seldom read that something from 1979 is “80s,” yet Scooby Doo always looks gloriously 1960s to me. It captured a point in time in the lovely 1960s before the gloomy, recession-ridden 1970s arrived, so it always seems to me like it was from that era. The first episode of “Scooby Doo, Where Are You?” was shown on a Saturday morning in September of 1969. The majority of the episodes were initially shown on television for the first time in 1970–1971, and a number of the subsequent series also had their debuts in the 1970s. #3 In point of fact, a fair proportion of the episodes were shown in the year 1969. This was due to the fact that they did not rerun cartoons as frequently back then, and seasons typically had a greater number of episodes. Also, the 1970s didn’t begin until 1971 (you don’t start numbering decades by zeros), but I often don’t bring that up because everyone seems to be confused about it.

  1. I was only four years old in 1969 when I saw the very first episode of Scooby-Doo, and to this day I can remember watching it.
  2. As someone who did this, I frequently wonder why people insist on referring to Scooby-Doo as a show from the 1970s.
  3. My best opinion is that it has something to do with the fact that the majority of Scooby-run Doo’s occurred in the 1970s, when the program was seen mostly by those who are now considered to be “Children of the ’70s,” who were also the show’s initial target demographic.
See also:  Where Can I Watch The Grinch Cartoon?

Thinking back on it now, Scooby-Doo did appear to herald a significant shift in the way Saturday morning cartoons were produced in the United States. Before that, the schedule often consisted of repeats of older cartoons like Yogi the Bear, The Flintstones, and vintage Loony Toons.

  1. That doesn’t quite capture what I mean, but what I want to say is that the designs of animated characters went from looking like larger animals or humans to looking more like miniature versions of themselves.
  2. According to what I’ve read, Scooby-Doo was inspired in part by the live action show The Many Loves of Doby Gillis and had been in pre-production for several years prior to the 1969 premier.

Now I don’t think Scooby-Doo was the cause of this change, but rather it was a cumulation of the changes that had been going on since the early 1960s. When I look back, the only program that was comparable in style to Scooby-Doo before it aired was the Archies cartoons.

  1. However, I’m not sure if that show truly pre-dates Scooby-Doo or if it was aired the same season or a year after (that’s one I can’t remember very well when it started).
  2. In any case, I believe that the entirety of the United States’ Saturday morning programming in 1969/1970 was remarkable.
  3. In addition, The BananaSplits and H.R.

Puffinstuff were performances throughout that season. When you put some serious thought into it, I believe that the years between 1969 and 1974 were some of the most innovative and memorable for children’s television in the United States. Despite the fact that this is just how I feel about it, I have a sneaking suspicion that it is just simpler for people to conceive of the era as the 1970s rather than the 1960s. In point of fact, a fair proportion of the episodes were shown in the year 1969. This was due to the fact that they did not rerun cartoons as frequently back then, and seasons typically had a greater number of episodes. Also, the 1970s didn’t begin until 1971 (you don’t start numbering decades by zeros), but I often don’t bring that up because everyone seems to be confused about it.

  1. I was only four years old in 1969 when I saw the very first episode of Scooby-Doo, and to this day I can remember watching it.
  2. As someone who did this, I frequently wonder why people insist on referring to Scooby-Doo as a show from the 1970s.
  3. My best opinion is that it has something to do with the fact that the majority of Scooby-run Doo’s occurred in the 1970s, when the program was seen mostly by those who are now considered to be “Children of the ’70s,” who were also the show’s initial target demographic.

Thinking back on it now, Scooby-Doo did appear to herald a significant shift in the way Saturday morning cartoons were produced in the United States. Before that, the schedule often consisted of repeats of older cartoons like Yogi the Bear, The Flintstones, and vintage Loony Toons.

  1. It seems that way of describing it isn’t quite accurate; what I’m trying to say is that the designs of animated characters went from having a larger animal/human type look to having a smaller type look.
  2. According to what I’ve read, Scooby-Doo was inspired in part by the live action show The Many Loves of Doby Gillis and had been in pre-production for several years prior to the 1969 premier.

Now I don’t think Scooby-Doo was the cause of this change, but rather it was a cumulation of the changes that had been going on since the early 1960s. When I look back, the only program that was comparable in style to Scooby-Doo before it aired was the Archies cartoons.

  1. However, I’m not sure if that show truly pre-dates Scooby-Doo or if it was aired the same season or a year after (that’s one I can’t remember very well when it started).
  2. In any case, I believe that the entirety of the United States’ Saturday morning programming in 1969/1970 was remarkable.
  3. In addition, The BananaSplits and H.R.

Puffinstuff were performances throughout that season. When you put some serious thought into it, I believe that the years between 1969 and 1974 were some of the most innovative and memorable for children’s television in the United States. Despite the fact that this is just how I feel about it, I have a sneaking suspicion that it is just simpler for people to conceive of the era as the 1970s rather than the 1960s.

People often think of cartoons from the 1960s, such as “Journey to the Center of the Earth,” “Fantastic Voyage,” “Superman,” and “Batman” from Filmation; “Secret Squirrel,” “Space Ghost,” “Herculoids,” “Shazzan,” “Birdman,” “Davy and Goliath,” “Impossibles,” “Space Kiddettes,” and “Birdman” from HB; ” (Not taking into consideration the fact that the weekday syndication slots were filled with the adventures of Marvel superheroes, “Eight Man,” “Thunderbirds,” “Kimba the White Lion,” “Speed Racer,” “Hector Heathcoate,” “Sinbad the Sailor,” and other similar shows) People tend to think of shows that “Scooby Doo” pretty much served as the fundamental blueprint for when they think about the 1970s.

See also:  How To Turn Someone Into A Cartoon?

I believe that “Archie” is considered to be another another source of influence for “Scooby Doo.” According to this point of view, Fred is equivalent to Archie, Daphne is equivalent to Veronica, Velma is equivalent to Betty, Shaggy is equivalent to Jughead, and Scooby is equivalent to Hot Dog.

  1. However, the funny features of Fred’s character did not develop until many years later.
  2. Which means that Reggie does not have an equivalent (though come to think of it, it just might have been interesting if the writers had developed the Red Herring character far earlier than they did).
  3. Yes, back in the day, a typical Saturday morning cartoon anthology on network television consisted of 32 shorts.

The progression would be the second season, which would consist of 16 episodes (and second seasons were extremely rare), followed by the third season, which would consist of 8 episodes, to be followed by seasons of continuous reruns or a total revamp of the show, depending on which option was chosen (“Scooby Doo” was archtypical in following this progression).

  1. Not until the debut of “The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show” did television networks begin the practice of routinely ordering 13 episodes for each season of a given program (one of the factors I think made the 1980s SatAM cartoons a knotch higher than those in the 1970s).
  2. The content of this page was last revised on November 17, 2005.

Joined on the 12th of May, 2003 Messages 766 #5 The first episode of Scooby Doo aired in the late 1960s. Regarding the pseudo-Archie designs, those appeared rather frequently in teenybopper comicbooks, which leads me to believe that Archie may have served as a source of inspiration for Scooby Doo. Along with the likes of Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys. #6 Scooby Doo was a popular cartoon in the 1960s. #7 To clarify, the year 1990 falls inside the 1980s decade, right? No way!! 14 July, 2002, Date of Joining, Messages 1,226 #8 The decade known as the 1970s lasted from 1970 to 1979. The years 1971 through 1980 comprised the 8th decade of the 20th century.

  1. In a similar vein, the 1900s covered the years 1900 to 1999, whereas the 20th century covered the years 1901 to 2000.
  2. At the very least, it is what I consistently tell other people.15 August 2004 Date of Joining Messages 454 #9 The decade known as the 1970s lasted from 1970 to 1979.
  3. The years 1971 through 1980 comprised the 8th decade of the 20th century.

Yes. The decade known as the 1970s refers to “the years beginning with 197.” That sums it up well.

How old is the original Scooby-Doo?

The first episode of the classic Scooby-Doo television series aired in 1969, and the show was an instant hit. Fred Silverman, an executive of CBS Television, was the brain behind the idea for the series, which was created by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears.

What dog breed is Scooby?

Great Danes are among the largest kinds of dogs, and Scooby Doo is a Great Dane. Iwao Takamoto, an animator at Hanna-Barbera Productions, is responsible for the creation of the character. When creating the character, Takamoto did extensive research on the breed, although he took a number of creative alterations for the fictitious series.

Was Scooby-Doo popular in the 80s?

There is no question that Scooby-Doo reached its pinnacle in the 1980s, despite the fact that the show didn’t debut until the 1970s.

Is Scooby-Doo the longest running cartoon?

A selection from Wikipedia’s Schools page in 2007. Cartoons and television are two topics that are related.

Scooby-Doo
A scene from “What a Night for a Knight”, the first episode of Scooby-Doo, Where are You! Clockwise from top: Shaggy, Fred, Scooby-Doo, Velma, and Daphne.
Genre Animation / Mystery
Running time
Creator(s) Joe Ruby and Ken Spears (uncredited; official credit is given to William Hanna and Joseph Barbera)
Starring
Country of origin United States
Original channel CBS ( 1969– 1976) ABC ( 1976– 1986, 1988– 1991) The WB ( 2002– 2005) CW ( 2006–)
Original run September 13, 1969–
No. of episodes 374 (as of October 18, 2006)
Official website

Scooby-Doo is the most successful and longest-running animated television series to have been created in the United States for Saturday morning television in its various incarnations beginning in 1969 and continuing up until the current day. Joe Ruby and Ken Spears are credited with the creation of the series for Hanna-Barbera Productions.

  1. During their tenure at the company, Hanna-Barbera Productions was responsible for the creation of a number of spin-offs and related works.
  2. The company was acquired by Warner Bros.
  3. in 1997, and the company has been in charge of production ever since.
  4. A talking Great Dane named Scooby-Doo and four teenagers named Fred “Freddie” Jones, Daphne Blake, Velma Dinkley, and Norville “Shaggy” Rogers are featured in the most well-known versions of the show, despite the fact that the format of the show and the cast (as well as the ages of the characters) have undergone significant changes over the course of the show’s history.
See also:  Where Can I Watch The Grinch Stole Christmas Cartoon?

These five characters, who are collectively known as “Mystery, Inc.” but were never referred to as such in the original series, travel the world in a van known as the “Mystery Machine” and solve mysteries, most of which include stories of ghosts and other supernatural forces.

At the conclusion of each episode, the supernatural powers are revealed to have an earthly basis for their actions (usually a criminal of some sort trying to scare people away so that they can commit crimes). Latter iterations of the program included more characters, such as Scooby’s cousin Scooby-Dum and nephew Scrappy-Doo, in addition to or in instead of some of the original characters.

These later iterations also featured varied takes on the show’s overall theme, which centered on the supernatural. The first run of Scooby-Doo episodes aired on CBS from 1969 through 1976, after which they were relocated to ABC. A Pup Named Scooby-Doo was shown on ABC from 1988 through 1991 after the original program was canceled by the network in 1986.

What was the original Scooby-Doo called?

The show was originally going to be called Mysteries Five, and the dog who would later be known as Scooby Doo was going to be a character who was more of a sidekick. He was going to be a bongo-playing dog named “Too Much,” and his breed would switch between Great Dane and sheepdog depending on the episode.

When did Scooby Doo first appear on TV?

Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!
Genre Mystery Adventure Comedy
Created by Joe Ruby Ken Spears
Developed by Joseph Barbera William Hanna Iwao Takamoto Fred Silverman
Directed by Joseph Barbera William Hanna
Voices of Don Messick Casey Kasem Frank Welker Nicole Jaffe Stefanianna Christopherson (1969-70) Heather North (1970)
Theme music composer David Mook Ben Raleigh
Opening theme “Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!” performed by Larry Marks (1969–70) George A. Robertson Jr. (1970)
Composer Ted Nichols (1969–70)
Country of origin United States
Original language English
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 41 ( list of episodes )
Production
Producers Joseph Barbera William Hanna
Running time 21 minutes approx
Production company Hanna-Barbera Productions
Distributor Taft Broadcasting
Release
Original network CBS (1969–70) ABC (1978)
Picture format Film
Audio format Mono
Original release September 13, 1969 – December 23, 1978
Chronology
Followed by The New Scooby-Doo Movies (1972–73)

Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! is an American animated comedy television series that is produced by Hanna-Barbera for the CBS television network. The series was conceived by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears. The first episode of the show aired on September 13, 1969, as part of the network’s Saturday morning animation programming.

  1. It continued to run for a total of two seasons, which ended on October 31, 1970.
  2. A number of episodes from the later programs Scooby’s All-Stars and The Scooby-Doo Show were shown on ABC in 1978 under the moniker Scooby, Where Are You!, and they were subsequently included in a DVD package that was billed as the show’s third season.

In addition, it was shown on BBC One in the United Kingdom from the years 1970 to 1973. Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! is the first iteration of a long-running media brand that largely consists of animated programs, many films, and goods relating to the character.

When did Scooby Doo Complete Series 3 come out?

Episodes that were produced in 1978, included to the Scooby’s All-Stars package, and then syndicated as part of The Scooby-Doo Show are included in The Complete Third Season, which was released on April 10, 2007, and contains all of those episodes. Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! : The Complete Series was initially made available for purchase by Warner Home Video on November 9, 2010.

Is there a new Scooby-Doo Show coming?

When Did Scooby Doo Cartoon Come Out 13 Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! (1969) – Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! When Hanna-Barbera was looking for a television program that was less dramatic and more family-friendly than their previous superhero cartoons, they came up with the first version of what would become one of their most iconic franchises.

Young viewers found the reoccurring format of Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! to be reassuring and comfortable, as it was something they had seen before. In addition to it, there was a good deal of slapstick humor, which was augmented by Shaggy and Scooby. After pursuing some of them about, the group would always solve the mystery by revealing the actual identity of the monster or ghost; often, an elderly person being crotchety and using a local legend to cover up a crime.

After the gang had done this, the mystery would be solved. After only a few short years, Hanna-Barbera would need to expand the Scooby-Doo franchise in order to satisfy viewers who simply couldn’t get enough of Scooby-Doo and the rest of the gang. Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! had a rapid rise to popularity after it was first released.